Secondary Electron Cloaking with Broadband Plasmonic Resonant Absorbers

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Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is one of the most powerful tools for nanoscale inspection and imaging. It is broadly used for biomedicine, materials science, and nanotechnology, enabling spatial resolution beyond the optical diffraction limit. In SEM, a high-energy electron beam illuminates a specimen, and the emitted secondary electrons are routed to a positively biased, synchronized detector for image creation. Here, for the first time, we experimentally demonstrate a cloaking of metallic objects from a secondary electron image. We make a metallic disc with a diameter of 300 nm almost invisible to a secondary electron detector with <5 nm spatial resolution. The secondary electron cloaking is based on broadband optical radiation absorption in the near field. Our secondary electron images are in good agreement with full-wave numerical solution of Maxwell's equations at optical frequencies, confirming the concept of secondary electron cloaking based on broadband optical radiation absorption.
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