Researchers, Nano Materials

Name Research interests
Dr. Asaf Albo
972-3-738-4713
Website
Prof. David Cahen
972-3-531-7876
Website
Dr. Eliahu Cohen
972-3-738-4268
Website
  • A new photonic quantum simulator based on cyclic quantum walks
  • Top-down causation and quantum physics 
  • Quantum Physics May Be Even Spookier Than You Think
  • How Quantum Wishes Can Turn Into Horses: A New Thought-Experiment Shows That Even Non-Events Can Have Causal Effects
Prof. Moshe Deutsch
972-3-531-8476
Website
  • Experimental x-ray studies of surface properties of liquid metals

  • simple liquids and liquid crystals

  • structure of mono-molecular Langmuir films

  • dynamical x-ray diffraction phenomena in perfect crystals

  • high precision crystal binding studies

  • X-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy

  • synchrotron radiation and its applications.
     
Prof. Lior Elbaz
972-3-738-4252
Website
Prof. Aharon Gedanken
972-3-531-8315
Website

Methods for preparing nanomatic materials

Sonochemistry, sonochemistry, the use of microwave radiation and a method called a rupture in which a part of a chemical laboratory becomes an autoclave.

We deal with a variety of uses of materials we have prepared.

Prof. Shmaryahu Hoz
972-3-531-8318
Website

Physical organic chemistry and computational nanotechnology

1. Reactions of SmI2

2. Computational nanotechnology

3. Chemical effects of electric fields

Prof. Jean-Paul Lellouche
972-3-531-8324
Website

1.Multifunctional Polymer Materials and Systems with Taylored Mechanical, Electrical and Optical Properties

2.Water-Compatible Surface Modifications of PET [poly(ethylene-terephthalate] Fibers by Grafted PEG Polymers, and/or Conducting Polymers

3.Smart Membrane for Hydrogen Energy Conversion: All Fuel Cell Functionalities in One Material

4.Chemically Modified Multi-, Single-, and Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs, SWCNTs, & DWCNTs) for the Reinforcement of Polymeric Matrices and Surface Functionalization/Nanostructuration

5.Nano-silencing in the cytoplasm and nucleus for killing of parasites and cancerous cells

6.Surface modifications of dental implants using inorganic particles

7.Functional bio-sensing nanostructured surfaces

8.Parylene-based artificial smart lenses fabricated using a novel solid-on-liquid deposition process

9.A Modular Active Nano-Platform for Advanced Cancer Management: Core Nanosystems, Tumor Targeting and Penetration, Molecular Imaging & Degradome-based Therapy

Dr. Tomer Lewi
972-3-738-4631
Website

Nano-photonics and nano-optics 

light-matter interactions

Optical metamaterials 

Two-dimensional materials

Prof. Dan Thomas Major
972-3-531-7392
Website

Computational Chemistry,

Computational Biochemistry,

Computational Nanotechnology

Prof. Shlomo Margel
972-3-531-8861
Website

Polymers & biopolymers; Surface chemistry; Thin films, Nanotechnology, Nabiotechnology and agro-nanotechnology; Encapsulation; Applications of magnetic and non-magnetic functional nanoparticles for medical (specific cell labeling and separation, diagnosis and therapy of cancer, multimodal contrast agents, wound healing, neurodegenerative disorders, etc.), agricultural and industrial applications.

Prof. Yitzhak Mastai
972-3-531-7681
Website
Dr. Doron Naveh
972-3-531-4657
Website

Organic Interfaces of 2D Materials & Devices

Materials Growth and Synthesis

Optoelectronic Devices

 

Prof. Yarden Opatowsky
972-3-531-8330
Website

Structural Studies of Cell Signaling Assemblies

We use structural and biochemical methods to study how cytokines activate receptors to initiate precise signaling events across the cell membrane. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are key players in the control of a wide range of cellular processes including proliferation, differentiation, migration and survival. They are composed of an extracellular domain to which specific ligands bind, a single-pass transmembrane helix, and an intracellular tyrosine kinase domain flanked by regulatory regions. We seek to understand how the extracellular event of ligand binding to the receptor is translated into an accurate intracellular response. We are also interested in structural investigations of coordinated signaling through assemblies of RTKs and co-receptors. Through the parallel use of X-ray crystallography and single-particle electron microscopy, we address basic mechanistic questions concerning the early stages of cell signaling.

Prof. Yitzhak Rabin
972-3-531-8857
Website

Biophysics and Soft Matter Physics: DNA elasticity and topology, DNA-protein interactions, DNA monolayers, protein nanopores, nuclear pore complex, chromatin structure and dynamics.

Prof. Adi Salomon
972-3-738-4235
Website

Plasmonics, 

Molecules-surface plasmons interaction,

Molecular dynamics,

Strong coupling systems.

Near field spectroscopy,

Second  Harmonic Generation (SHG)

Dr. Hagay Shpaisman
972-3-738-4255
Website
  • Influencing polymerization & phase separation processes with Holographic Optical Tweezers
  • Developing bubble based acousto-driven micro-particles
  • Advancing light controlled microfluidics
  • Creating position sensitive micro structures
Prof. Eli Sloutskin
972-3-738-4506
Website
  • Experimental studies of phase transitions in colloids.
  • Quantitative real-time 3D confocal microscopy, holographic optical tweezing, and light scattering techniques.
  • Crystal nucleation.
  • Non-crystalline solids: structural measurements to reveal the physics of glass formation.
  • Interfacial phenomena in colloidal and molecular systems.
Prof. Chaim Sukenik
972-3-531-8072
Website

1. Organic Monolayers for Catalyst Immobilization

2. Wafer Bonding for Photonics and Micro-electronics

3. Oxide Thin Films for Controlling the Chemical and Physical Properties of Interfaces

4.  Engineering Organic Interfaces for Studying Electron Transfer

5.  Controlling Biomaterial Interfaces

Prof. David Zitoun
972-3-738-4513
Website

Bottom-up approach of nano-devices

The aim of the laboratory is to elaborate nano-components for batteries, fuel cells, redox-flow batteries and sensors. The laboratory works on the integration of these nano-building blocks in devices.

Dr Zitoun's lab develops an alternative route to elaborate thin films using wet chemistry deposition. Two major routes are explored; the first one consists in the colloidal synthesis of nanospheres and nanowires which are spread on the substrate by wet coating. In a second approach, the molecular precursor is directly targeted to the substrate and reacts in situ. The lab synthesizes reactive organometallic complexes and studies the thermolysis, photolysis and chemical reduction of these complexes. Dr. Zitoun brings a major achievement with the use of designed reactive organometallic precursors that could be decomposed to form metallic coatings down to room temperature. This approach allows direct synthesis on the desired substrate (metallic, plastic...) with the use of standard coating equipment and/or state of the art research equipment, like Atomic Layer Deposition.
 

Particular research areas (projects):

1. Nanomaterials

2. Energy storage

3. Magnetism